In the interest of public safety, the IAF’s offices are closed until future notice. Staff are continuing to work off-site supporting Inuit artists and their work.

During this unprecedented and challenging time, it is more important than ever to remain connected to each other. The IAF remains committed to making sure that artists have access to opportunities and bringing you inspiring artworks, artist profiles and untold stories.

Thank you for being a part of our community, we wish you health and comfort during this difficult time.

20 Carvers to Know in 2020: Ruben Anton Komangapik

by Jessica MacDonald | Jan 14, 2020

Although he carved sporadically as a child, Ruben Anton Komangapik became serious about art-making when he enrolled in the Jewelry and Metalwork Arts program at Nunavut Arctic College. Innovative, unique and surprising, his works bridge the gap between traditional and contemporary, mystical and physical. As a stone and bone sculptor and a member of the Metal Guild of Canada, Komangapik’s mastery of different mediums leaves him free to mix materials in unique ways, like laying metalwork or precious gems into stone and bone carvings. 

Komangapik’s paternal grandfather Joshua Komangapik, who played a leading role in his childhood in Mittimatalik (Pond Inlet), NU, is one of the reasons Komangapik engages so frequently with Inuit spirituality and traditional mythology. His depictions of shamans and shamanistic activity are influenced by Joshua, who was known for his spiritual abilities within his community. Another factor is Komangapik’s determination to hold on to his culture. “When I’m lost in my art—I’m at home,” says Komangapik, a valuable immersion technique for someone like Komangapik, who has moved far from his birthplace and now resides in Quebec. 

Sedna shows Komangapik’s carving abilities with notoriously brittle whalebone, and his clever use of the texture of the material to depict individual strands of hair on Sedna’s head. The graceful arc of her tail belies the temperament indicated by the open mouth and staring eyes, showing both the tender and tempestuous facets of this notoriously stormy goddess.

Find More Carvers

20 Carvers to Know in 2020: Ruben Anton Komangapik

by Jessica MacDonald | Jan 14, 2020

Although he carved sporadically as a child, Ruben Anton Komangapik became serious about art-making when he enrolled in the Jewelry and Metalwork Arts program at Nunavut Arctic College. Innovative, unique and surprising, his works bridge the gap between traditional and contemporary, mystical and physical. As a stone and bone sculptor and a member of the Metal Guild of Canada, Komangapik’s mastery of different mediums leaves him free to mix materials in unique ways, like laying metalwork or precious gems into stone and bone carvings. 

Komangapik’s paternal grandfather Joshua Komangapik, who played a leading role in his childhood in Mittimatalik (Pond Inlet), NU, is one of the reasons Komangapik engages so frequently with Inuit spirituality and traditional mythology. His depictions of shamans and shamanistic activity are influenced by Joshua, who was known for his spiritual abilities within his community. Another factor is Komangapik’s determination to hold on to his culture. “When I’m lost in my art—I’m at home,” says Komangapik, a valuable immersion technique for someone like Komangapik, who has moved far from his birthplace and now resides in Quebec. 

Sedna shows Komangapik’s carving abilities with notoriously brittle whalebone, and his clever use of the texture of the material to depict individual strands of hair on Sedna’s head. The graceful arc of her tail belies the temperament indicated by the open mouth and staring eyes, showing both the tender and tempestuous facets of this notoriously stormy goddess.

Find More Carvers

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Artist


Janet Nungnik


Janet Nungnik is a talented artist from Qamani'tuaq (Baker Lake), NU, who uses embroidery and appliqué to create immense wallhangings that tell the story of her life and people. Nungnik has had two solo exhibitions in the previous year, The Eagle's Shadow at Marion Scott Gallery and a self-titled show at the MicMichael Canadian Art Collection. Nungnik will be featured in the upcoming Spring 2020 Threads issue as part of Krista Ulujuk Zawadski's piece "Threading Memories".


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Igloo Tag

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The Canadian federal government created the Igloo Tag Trademark in 1958 in order to protect Inuit visual art from mass-produced, fraudulent work. The trademark, most often applied to sculpture, is a safeguard for collectors and artists that only applied to works made by Inuit.

The Inuit Art Foundation accepted the rights to the trademark from the government in 2017. For the first time, the trademark is now led by Inuit, for Inuit.

 

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