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SPECIAL FEATURE

What Gets Lost


The Canadian Eskimo Arts Council's Rejected Prints



The CEAC spent decades moderating the sale of Inuit art to southern audiences by prohibiting works arbitrarily deemed unacceptable from entering the market. We examine what works were rejected and why.


by IAQ

20 Carvers to Know in 2020: Damien Iquallaq

by Jessica MacDonald | Jan 13, 2020

“I am going to be carving for the rest of my life,” says Damien Iquallaq. Iquallaq worked at Ashoona Studios in Yellowknife, NT, before setting up his own studio in Iqaluktuuttiaq (Cambridge Bay), NU. His practise is rooted in the carving legacy of his brothers and grandfather, Nelson Takkiruq, and often takes the form of traditional legends and local animals.

Intricately detailed and finely textured, Iquallaq carvings combine a roster of unusual materials, from fossilized mammoth teeth to petrified wood and muskox boss. “It’s pretty tricky stuff when you get into detailed and figurative work,” Iquallaq says. “Once you remove something it changes the whole composition of the piece.” To give himself more room to play, Iquallaq prefers to carve from larger mammoth tusks where possible, which he sources from Russia and Siberia. One key piece in Iquallaq’s carving arsenal? A heated shed. “To do more detailed work I need to be able to move freely and take my gloves off. You just can’t do that kind of work when it’s -30° C outside.”

Since he branched into jewelry and accessories, metal has started making more frequent appearances in Iquallaq’s work. Created in response to the resurgence of tattooing taking place in his community, Traditional Inuit Tattoos features inlaid copper kakiniit (tattoos) encircling raised stone arms, a testament both to the resiliency of Inuit culture and to Iquallaq’s own ingenuity and creativity as an artist.

Find More Carvers

20 Carvers to Know in 2020: Damien Iquallaq

by Jessica MacDonald | Jan 13, 2020

“I am going to be carving for the rest of my life,” says Damien Iquallaq. Iquallaq worked at Ashoona Studios in Yellowknife, NT, before setting up his own studio in Iqaluktuuttiaq (Cambridge Bay), NU. His practise is rooted in the carving legacy of his brothers and grandfather, Nelson Takkiruq, and often takes the form of traditional legends and local animals.

Intricately detailed and finely textured, Iquallaq carvings combine a roster of unusual materials, from fossilized mammoth teeth to petrified wood and muskox boss. “It’s pretty tricky stuff when you get into detailed and figurative work,” Iquallaq says. “Once you remove something it changes the whole composition of the piece.” To give himself more room to play, Iquallaq prefers to carve from larger mammoth tusks where possible, which he sources from Russia and Siberia. One key piece in Iquallaq’s carving arsenal? A heated shed. “To do more detailed work I need to be able to move freely and take my gloves off. You just can’t do that kind of work when it’s -30° C outside.”

Since he branched into jewelry and accessories, metal has started making more frequent appearances in Iquallaq’s work. Created in response to the resurgence of tattooing taking place in his community, Traditional Inuit Tattoos features inlaid copper kakiniit (tattoos) encircling raised stone arms, a testament both to the resiliency of Inuit culture and to Iquallaq’s own ingenuity and creativity as an artist.

Find More Carvers

20 Carvers to Know in 2020: Damien Iquallaq

by Jessica MacDonald | Jan 13, 2020

“I am going to be carving for the rest of my life,” says Damien Iquallaq. Iquallaq worked at Ashoona Studios in Yellowknife, NT, before setting up his own studio in Iqaluktuuttiaq (Cambridge Bay), NU. His practise is rooted in the carving legacy of his brothers and grandfather, Nelson Takkiruq, and often takes the form of traditional legends and local animals.

Intricately detailed and finely textured, Iquallaq carvings combine a roster of unusual materials, from fossilized mammoth teeth to petrified wood and muskox boss. “It’s pretty tricky stuff when you get into detailed and figurative work,” Iquallaq says. “Once you remove something it changes the whole composition of the piece.” To give himself more room to play, Iquallaq prefers to carve from larger mammoth tusks where possible, which he sources from Russia and Siberia. One key piece in Iquallaq’s carving arsenal? A heated shed. “To do more detailed work I need to be able to move freely and take my gloves off. You just can’t do that kind of work when it’s -30° C outside.”

Since he branched into jewelry and accessories, metal has started making more frequent appearances in Iquallaq’s work. Created in response to the resurgence of tattooing taking place in his community, Traditional Inuit Tattoos features inlaid copper kakiniit (tattoos) encircling raised stone arms, a testament both to the resiliency of Inuit culture and to Iquallaq’s own ingenuity and creativity as an artist.

Find More Carvers

 

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Featured
Artist

Tarralik Duffy

Tarralik Duffy is a talented artist, jeweller and writer from Salliq (Coral Harbour), NU currently based in Saskatoon, SK. Working primarily in jewellery design, she also uses textiles and other mediums to produce clothing and accessories for her label Ugly Fish. She has travelled across Canada exhibiting and selling her work including shows at the Winnipeg Art Gallery in Winnipeg, MB. Her work is currently available at the National Gallery of Canada Boutique in Ottawa, ON. Recently, Duffy contributed the Feature story "Uvanga/Self: Picturing Our Identity" on self-portraiture for the Fall 2018 issue of the "Inuit Art Quarterly."

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Igloo Tag

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The Canadian federal government created the Igloo Tag Trademark in 1958 in order to protect Inuit visual art from mass-produced, fraudulent work. The trademark, most often applied to sculpture, is a safeguard for collectors and artists that only applied to works made by Inuit.

The Inuit Art Foundation accepted the rights to the trademark from the government in 2017. For the first time, the trademark is now led by Inuit, for Inuit.

 

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